Blogs in libraryland

September 19, 2005

I’ve only been reading different blogs for several months. One of the reference librarians at the library where I work had a question about RSS feeds and XML which led me the world of blogs. In the course of answering a simple question, I discovered a fascinating new world. At this point, I may even be a bit addicted to blogs – seriously. Some mornings I can’t wait to log into my computer and see what new posts are waiting for me in my aggregator. The majority of blogs in my reader are library-related ones. The information that people post is incredible. This has definitely become one of my favorite ways of keeping up with trends in libraries.

Of course, there are so many posts that keeping up with them can be overwhelming. This is one of the reasons that I really enjoy the Carnival of Infosciences which is essentially a roundup of the best, most interesting posts from library bloggers from a set period of time. For more information, see this post at Open Stacks where the Carnival of Infosciences originated. To date, there have been seven Carnivals hosted by various bloggers. To check them out, see Carnival of Infosciences #1 (hosted by Open Stacks), Carnival of Infosciences #2 (hosted by Open Stacks), Carnival of Infosciences #3 (hosted by Wanderings of a Student Librarian), Carnival of Infosciences #4 (hosted by lis.dom), Carnival of Infosciences #5 (hosted by Christina’s LIS Rant), Carnival of Infosciences #6 (hosted by . . . the thoughts are broken . . .), and the current Carnival of Infosciences #7 (hosted by Mike’s Musings). The things that librarians and library professionals come up amaze me some time!!

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More on the class wiki

September 19, 2005

I spent most of the weekend thinking about my class wiki project and how best to get classmates to join in and collaborate. At this point, I think my plan is to create (or have others create) individual pages for each of the search engines and ask students to post comments about each of the search engines that they surveyed. It seems as if this would allow for more collaboration – which I think is essential for a successful wiki project. I’m hoping to get emails out this week to everyone in class asking for their help with the project.